Companion Policy to NI 81-102 Investment Funds
Part 3 Investments
Section 3.7

Securities Lending, Repurchase and Reverse Repurchase Transactions

(1) Section 2.12, 2.13 and 2.14 of the instrument each contains a number of conditions that must be satisfied in order that an investment fund may enter into a securities lending, repurchase or reverse repurchase transaction in compliance with the Instrument. It is expected that, in addition to satisfying these conditions, the manager on behalf of the investment fund, in co-ordination with an agent, will ensure that the documentation evidencing these types of transactions contains customary provisions to protect the investment fund and to document the transaction properly. Among other things, these provisions would normally include

(a) a definition of an “event of default” under the agreement, which would include failure to deliver cash or securities, or to promptly pay to the investment fund amounts equal to dividends and interest paid, and distributions made, on loaned or sold securities, as required by the agreement

(b) provisions giving non-defaulting parties rights of termination, rights to sell the collateral, rights to purchase identical securities to replace the loaned securities and legal rights of set-off in connection with their obligations if an event of default occurs and

(c) provisions that deal with, if an event of default occurs, how the value of collateral or securities held by the non-defaulting party that is in excess of the amount owed by the defaulting party will be treated.

(2) Section 2.12, 2.13 and 2.14 of the instrument each imposes a requirement that an investment fund that has entered into a securities lending, repurchase or reverse repurchase transaction hold cash or securities of at least 102% of the market value of the securities or cash held by the investment fund’s counterparty under the transaction. It is noted that the 102% requirement is a minimum requirement, and that it may be appropriate for the manager of an investment fund, or the agent acting on behalf of the investment fund, to negotiate the holding of a greater amount of cash or securities if necessary to protect the interests of the investment fund in a particular transaction, having regard to the level of risk for the investment fund in the transaction. In addition, if the recognized best practices for a particular type of transaction in a particular market calls for a higher level of collateralization than 102%, it is expected that, absent special circumstances, the manager or the agent would ensure that its arrangements reflect the relevant best practices for that transaction.

(3) Paragraph 3 of subsection 2.12(1) of the Instrument refers to securities lending transactions in terms of securities that are “loaned” by an investment fund in exchange for collateral. Some securities lending transactions are documented so that title to the “loaned” securities is transferred from the “lender” to the “borrower”. The Canadian securities regulatory authorities do not consider this fact as sufficient to disqualify those transactions as securities loan transactions within the meaning of the Instrument, so long as the transaction is in fact substantively a loan. References throughout the Instrument to “loaned” securities, and similar references, should be read to include securities “transferred” under a securities lending transaction.

(4) Subparagraph 6(d) of subsection 2.12(1) permits the use of irrevocable letters of credit as collateral in securities lending transactions. The Canadian securities regulatory authorities believe that, at a minimum, the prudent use of letters of credit will involve the following arrangements:

(a) the investment fund should be allowed to draw down any amount of the letter of credit at any time by presenting its sight draft and certifying that the borrower is in default of its obligations under the securities lending agreement, and the amount capable of being drawn down would represent the current market value of the outstanding loaned securities or the amount required to cure any other borrower default; and

(b) the letter of credit should be structured so that the lender may draw down, on the date immediately preceding its expiration date, an amount equal to the current market value of all outstanding loaned securities on that date.

(5) Paragraph 9 of subsection 2.12(1) and paragraph 8 of subsection 2.13(1) of the Instrument each provides that the agreement under which an investment fund enters into a securities lending or repurchase transaction include a provision requiring the investment fund’s counterparty to promptly pay to the investment fund, among other things, distributions made on the securities loaned or sold in the transaction. In this context, the term “distributions” should be read broadly to include all payments or distributions of any type made on the underlying securities, including, without limitation, distributions of

(6) Sections 2.12, 2.13 and 2.14 of the Instrument each make reference to the “delivery” and “holding” of securities or collateral by the investment fund. The Canadian securities regulatory authorities note that these terms will include the delivery or holding by an agent for an investment fund. In addition, the Canadian securities regulatory authorities recognize that under ordinary market practice, agents pool collateral for securities lending/repurchase clients; this pooling of itself is not considered a violation of the Instrument.

(7) Sections 2.12, 2.13 and 2.14 of the Instrument each require that the securities involved in a securities lending, repurchase or reverse repurchase transaction be marked to market daily and adjusted as required daily. It is recognized that market practice often involves an agent marking to market a portfolio at the end of a business day, and effecting the necessary adjustments to a portfolio on the next business day. So long as each action occurs on each business day, as required by the Instrument, this market practice is not a breach of the Instrument.

(8) As noted in subsection (7), the Instrument requires the daily marking to market of the securities involved in a securities lending, repurchase or reverse repurchase transaction. The valuation principles used in this marking to market may be those generally used by the agent acting for the investment fund, even if those principles deviate from the principles that are used by the investment fund in valuing its portfolio assets for the purposes of calculating net asset value.

(9) Paragraph 6 of subsection 2.13(1) of the Instrument imposes a requirement concerning the delivery of sales proceeds to the investment fund equal to 102% of the market value of the securities sold in the transaction. It is noted that accrued interest on the sold securities should be included in the calculation of the market value of those securities.

(10) Section 2.15 of the Instrument imposes the obligation on a manager of an investment fund to appoint an agent or agents to administer its securities lending and repurchase transactions, and makes optional the ability of a manager to appoint an agent or agents to administer its reverse repurchase transactions. A manager that appoints more than one agent to carry out these functions may allocate responsibility as it considers best. For instance, it may be appropriate that one agent be responsible for domestic transactions, with one or more agents responsible for offshore transactions. Managers should ensure that the various requirements of sections 2.15 and 2.16 of the Instrument are satisfied for all agents.

(11) It is noted that the responsibilities of an agent appointed under section 2.15 of the Instrument include all aspects of acting on behalf of an investment fund in connection with securities lending, repurchase or reverse repurchase agreements. This includes acting in connection with the reinvestment of collateral or securities held during the life of a transaction.

(12) Subsection 2.15(3) of the Instrument requires that an agent appointed by an investment fund to administer its securities lending, repurchase or reverse repurchase transactions shall be a custodian or sub-custodian of the investment fund. It is noted that the provisions of Part 6 of the Instrument generally apply to the agent in connection with its activities relating to securities lending, repurchase or reverse repurchase transactions. The agent must have been appointed as custodian or sub- custodian in accordance with section 6.1, and must satisfy the other requirements of Part 6 in carrying out its responsibilities.

(13) Subsection 2.15(4) of the Instrument provides that the manager of an investment fund must not authorize an agent to enter into securities lending, repurchase or, if applicable, reverse repurchase transactions on behalf of the investment fund unless there is a written agreement between the agent, the manager and the investment fund that deals with certain prescribed matters. Subsection (4) requires that the manager and the investment fund, in the agreement, provide instructions to the agent on the parameters to be followed in entering into the type of transaction to which the agreement pertains. The parameters would normally include

(a) details on the types of transactions that may be entered into by the investment fund;

(b) types of portfolio assets of the investment fund to be used in the transaction;

(c) specification of maximum transaction size, or aggregate amount of assets that may be committed to transactions at any one time;

(d) specification of permitted counterparties;

(e) any specific requirements regarding collateralization, including minimum requirements as to amount and diversification of collateralization, and details on the nature of the collateral that may be accepted by the investment fund;

(f) directions and an outline of responsibilities for the reinvestment of cash collateral received by the investment fund under the program to ensure that proper levels of liquidity are maintained at all times; and

(g) duties and obligations on the agent to take action to obtain payment by a borrower of any amounts owed by the borrower.

(14) The definition of “cash cover” contained in section 1.1 of the Instrument requires that the portfolio assets used for cash cover not be “allocated for specific purposes”. Securities loaned by a mutual fund in a securities lending transaction have been allocated for specific purposes and therefore cannot be used as cash cover by the mutual fund for its specified derivatives obligations.

(15) An investment fund sometimes needs to vote securities held by it in order to protect its interests in connection with corporate transactions or developments relating to the issuers of the securities. The manager and the portfolio adviser of an investment fund, or the agent of the investment fund administering a securities lending program on behalf of the investment fund, should monitor corporate developments relating to securities that are loaned by the investment fund in securities lending transactions, and take all necessary

(16) As part of the prudent management of a securities lending, repurchase or reverse repurchase program, managers of investment funds, together with their agents, should ensure that transfers of securities in connection with those programs are effected in a secure manner over an organized market or settlement system. For foreign securities, this may entail ensuring that securities are cleared through central depositories. Investment funds and their agents should pay close attention to settlement arrangements when entering into securities lending, repurchase and reverse repurchase transactions.